Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Can you tell. . .

. . . that I'm passionate about where I live? There are more than half a million people who call the District of Columbia home. I'm not talking about suburbanites who say they live here because it's easier and more recognizable. We residents are the ones who tolerate the daily V.I.P. police escorts, protesters, and special events. They're part of the price we willingly pay to live in the nation's capital. D.C. is divided into quadrants as well as diverse neighborhoods. Tourists seldom visit them unless, maybe, they're lost. Brookland, Friendship Heights, Glover Park, Anacostia, West End, and Marshall Heights, to name a few, are not as recognizable as Capitol Hill, Georgetown or Foggy Bottom, but each has it's own character and history. The U Street corridor, for example, was once THE PLACE to see and hear the likes of D.C.'s own Duke Ellington and Billie Eckstein as well as other great African-American musicians, writers and philosophers. Frederick Douglass built a gracious house he called Cedar Hill in Anacostia. Marjorie Merriweather Post built her house on the edge of Rock Creek Park and filled it with treasures from Imperial Russia. Her extravagant, tasteful gardens blend in on the edge of the park, another treasure in itself. Both are open to the public. No, I don't work for the city or any tourism company. I just love D.C. and wish more visitors could enjoy it as we residents do. It's SO much more than its museums and memorials and I've just scratched the surface of my town's cultural riches.

2 comments:

Kari said...

I was there in the 11th grade on a field trip.. I'd like to go back and see more of the city. I think we did the top touristy things only - like the white house and monuments.

It seemed like a cool place though, what I did see of it. :)

dcpeg said...

Come on back! DC has changed bigtime since you were here. When my husband and I get back from vacation, I want to photograph some of the less commonly known places and post them on my blog. Actually, the city has started running neighborhood tours so visitors get to see more of "hometown" DC. There're even some of those amphibious vehicles that take people out on the Potomac then drive around the sights. Weird looking things, but they're always seems full.